Saturday, September 30, 2017

Mindfulness on your deathbed

Such a disinterested enjoyment of nature as shown by Shingen and Kenshin even in the midst of warlike activities, is known as furyu, and those without this feeling of furyu are classed among the most uncultured in Japan.  The feeling is not merely aesthetical. it has also a religious significance. It is perhaps the same mental attitude that has created the custom among cultured Japanese of writing a verse in either Japanese or Chinese at the moment of death. The verse is known as the “partig-with-life verse.” The Japanese have been taught and trained to be able to find a moment’s leisure to detach themselves from the intensest excitements in which they may happen to be placed. Death is the most serious affair absorbing all one’s attention but the cultured Japanese think they ought to be able to transcend it and view it objectively.

D.T. Suzuki, "Zen and The Japanese Culture"

[有名な故事「敵に塩を送る」など]戦の真最中に、信玄や謙信が示した、かかる利害を超越した「自然」の享楽は「風流」と呼ばれている。この風流の感情なきものは、日本では最も教養のないもののなかに入れられている。この感情は単に美的のみならず宗教的な意義をもっている。諸芸に通じた教養ある日本人の間に、臨終に際して詩歌をかく習慣を創始したのも、おそらくは同じ心的態度にもとづく。かかる詩歌は「辞世の詩や歌」として知られている。日本人は自分たちが最も激しい興奮の状に置かれることがあっても、そこから自己を引離す一瞬の余裕を見つけるように教えられ、また、鍛練されてきた。死は一切の注意力を集注させる最も厳粛な出来事であるが、教養ある日本人はそれを超越して、客観的に視なければならぬと考えている。
(p.93)


鈴木大拙『禅と日本文化』